Around this time I’m often asked what I think will be the big technology trends for the coming year. This time I thought it would make sense to get my thoughts together and share them on my YouTube channel.

As it happened the first opportunity I had to do this was while I was in Las Vegas for CES – rather aptly, the world’s largest technology show.

So, in no particular order, my top tech predictions for the year ahead:

  • Virtual Reality – 2016 is the year VR takes its biggest steps yet into the mainstream. Off the back of major investments and acquisitions by some of consumer technology’s largest firms, this year sees long-awaited releases from the likes of Sony (PlayStation VR), Facebook (Oculus Rift), HTC (HTC Vive). Virtual reality becomes actual reality this year, and Christmas 2016 will be a key battleground.
  • Biometrics – If the high-profile hacks and data breaches of 2015 taught us anything it’s that username and passwords are broken. Biometric authentication – whether fingerprint, retina or even voice – will continue to grow in 2016.
  • Mobile Payments – Apple Pay, Android Pay and more please – I for one am hoping it’s all change for loose change this year as these payment systems expand beyond premium devices into the mid-range. And while BitCoin took a bit of a battering in 2015, the underlying block chain technology is what is piquing the interesting of many mainstream players.
  • Internet of Things – Embedding everyday objects with computing power and connectivity; connecting people with their possessions and their possessions with one another (I may have unwittingly borrowed, condensed or paraphrased those definitions from others over the years). I really hope we stop talking about IoT in 2016 and start seeing it instead – more everyday stuff getting connected (notwithstanding safety concerns – VTech et al). A little less IoT conversation, a little more IoT action please.
  • Drones – in the beginning drones were about fun: the category breakthrough device was the 2010 Parrot AR.Drone, an augmented reality gaming device (hence the AR); however, the French firm soon realised the onboard camera was what got everybody excited and so the drone photography and videography revolution began. However, the next revolution here will be about non-camera payloads – how drones (eg Amazon delivery drones are a, ahem, Prime example) are able to carry small packages further and further.

The YouTube video was picked up by ITN Productions tech show N2K and cut into one of the January episodes – I haven’t seen the show yet but will be sure to share here when I do.

I rather enjoyed compiling my 2016 predictions, so I plan to do a debrief later in the year to see how close to the mark I’ve been, then to try again with my top tech trends for 2017.