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Technology Expert David McClelland on ITV Good Morning Britain talking Apple iPhone

iCloud Celebrity Photo Hack and Apple Watch on Good Morning Britain

September has been a busy month for television appearances. As well as new seasons of BBC1 Rip Off Britain and Planet of the Apps for Ginx TV, twice I’ve been up bright and early sitting on the ITV Good Morning Britain sofa.

The stories I covered were both Apple-focused, but at different ends of the good news spectrum.

First up was the iPhone 6 and 6 plus launch along with the long-awaited announcement of an Apple Watch. Apple product launches are always big news, but this year’s phones were equally big to match.

Technology Expert David McClelland on ITV Good Morning Britain talking the iCloud Celebrity Photo Hack and Apple iPhone with Susanna Reid and Ben Shepherd

The ‘iCloud Celebrity Photo Hack’ (or “The Fappening”, as it has also come to be known) is an altogether different news item, made more difficult because there’s a lot that’s still unknown about how private photos of celebrities came to be leaked in the first place – not least, whether Apple’s iCloud is even culpable.

I’ve uploaded my notes on the iCloud Celeb-gate story (do keep in mind that’s exactly what they are, just notes), and I’ll be sure to update them as regularly as I can while the story develops.

BBC One - Rip Off Britain Logo

How to Keep your Passwords Secure

The new series of Rip Off Britain is well underway, airing on BBC1 throughout September and October.

As usual I’ve been appearing with the team giving expert advice on safe and savvy use of technology and the internet.David McClelland, Tech Expert, BBC Rip Off Britain

It’s been a busy series for me: as well as appearing in the Popup Shop in the West Midlands I’ve been covering a variety of topics including online password security, nuisance call blockers, how online advertising works, and taking care when connecting to public Wi-Fi hotspots.

One item that has generated a lot of interest is online password security.

On average we have 26 online logins each in the UK, with 25-34 years old managing up to 40. Most wording of all is that Experian, who conducted the research, found that despite the number of accounts we all manage we each use an average of just 5 different passwords! When researching the item I tried to count how many online accounts I owned: I stopped when I reached 90. I know I’ve many more, and it’s a number that’s only going to grow. I also realised that it’s very rare that I go back to delete an account that I no longer use, particularly if it’s with an online retailer I’ve used just the once to buy a gift.

In the show I ran a workshop in a shopping centre to highlight the challenges of safely managing our online accounts. Of course, it’s a big subject with too much to share in a short item on television, so to help further we produced a leaflet.

My “How to manage and remember your online passwords” leaflet contains tips on how to make your online accounts as safe as possible, including choosing passwords and passphrases that are difficult for fraudsters to guess or crack, and an introduction to password management software. You can download the leaflet from the BBC website.

Watch Rip Off Britain on BBC iPlayer or to see clips of the show and further tips visit the BBC Rip Off Britain website. Also, look out for details of the Rip Off Britain Live show on BBC1 from 20th-24th October 2014.

BBC Radio Cumbria

BBC Local Radio Technology Corner

BBC Radio CumbriaBBC Radio Cumbria invited me to join them for a weekly technology spot in their morning show over the summer.

In Technology Corner I’ve been exploring everything in science and tech from Google Glass, smartwatches and the latest in wearables, to alternative fuels, eco-homes and upgrade culture. During the BBC’s WW1 centenary commemorations I presented a special item on technology that has changed the world over the last 100 years.

I’m live on air with Kevin Fernihough most weeks on Tuesdays or Wednesdays at 11:35am (I’ll usually post an update on Twitter beforehand). You can listen live to BBC Radio Cumbria just here or via the BBC iPlayer Radio app.

BBC One - Rip Off Britain Logo

BBC Rip Off Britain – Season 6

BBC Rip Off Britain 2014The BBC Rip Off Britain Pop Up Shop opened its doors at the Dudley Merry Hill shopping centre in June and once again I was behind the counter serving up healthy slices of consumer advice on all things technology and telecoms.

This is the third season of Rip Off Britain I’ve worked on for the BBC, and after Pop Up Shops in Gateshead and Liverpool I was delighted to rejoin Angela, Gloria, Julia and the team in the Midlands.

Roaming or using your mobile phone abroad was a recurring theme this year as was dealing with nuisance phone calls – in fact I’ve been investigating nuisance call blocker technology for another of this season’s episodes. Among the other items I’ve shot for this series include a film on safe online shopping and another uncovering the ingenuity of online advertising.

This year in Dudley also I ran two public workshops for the show: one on everyday mobile security and safety, revealing how public Wi-Fi hotspots might not be as safe as they seem, and another on how a lock screen passcode still isn’t enough to stop you getting stung if your smartphone gets lost or stolen.

The new series of Rip Off Britain airs on BBC One in September 2014, beginning on Monday the 15th September at 9.15am.

Audi quattro - The Power of Four

Audi Quattro – The Power of Four

Vorsprung durch Technik. Audi’s celebrated motto translates as Progress through Technology. Funnily enough it’s a vision I relate to.

Audi quattro - The Power of Four

Over the last few months I’ve been working with Audi on a series of films to showcase just how progressive their technology is.

The Power of Four is one of my favourites. Shot at the MIRA secure vehicle testing facility in Nuneaton we assembled a handful of high-end Audis, an award-winning precision driver and a super slow-motion camera, and drove the cars over treacherous road surfaces to show how quattro all-wheel drive helps when you need it most.

We’ve also just shot a couple of films about the A3 etron and the new Audi TT – I’ll be sure to post those here when they go live.

Hats off to the terrific team at Vertical Productions in London who produce the films for Audi.

You can keep up to date with all of Audi’s latest news by subscribing to the Audi Channel on YouTube.

Heartbleed Bug

ITV Daybreak: De-mything the Heartbleed Bug

David McClelland ITV Daybreak2014 is seeing internet and online security feature in the mainstream news more than ever before. This week I appeared on ITV Daybreak to help de-myth the Heartbleed Bug.

Here’s what we know about Heartbleed (as of today – it’s a developing story) plus some pointers about what you need to do to protect yourself:

What is the Heartbleed Bug? The Heartbleed Bug (or CVE-2014-0160 to give it its official name) is a vulnerability in OpenSSL, the fundamental bit of code used by as many as 500,000 websites to encrypt the data we send online. The upshot is that sensitive data such as our usernames, passwords and credit card details could potentially have been exposed to hackers. It doesn’t matter what device you’re using to connect to the web – a laptop, Mac, Windows, iPhone or Android – the vulnerability is on the web server that you’re connecting to.

Is it serious? Heartbleed is a serious enough vulnerability that it’s forced website owners all over the world to update, to patch their web servers. And we’re talking about the big players, like Yahoo and its services such as Flickr and Tumblr; some banks and even the FBI’s website are impacted too, an estimated half a million sites in total. Some sites such as Google and Facebook managed to patch their services early on or before the vulnerability was made public, but that doesn’t mean they weren’t vulnerable beforehand. And it’s not just websites that use OpenSSL, it’s email and instant messaging services too.

Who has exploited it? Concerningly, even though the Heartbleed Bug has only just been made public (by researchers at Google and Codenomicon) this vulnerability has been around for a couple of years. Perhaps nobody knew it was there until the last week. Perhaps (and this is speculation) some people did know but, having free access to privileged and sensitive data, chose to keep quiet about it. As it’s difficult to trace if and when the vulnerability has been exploited, we may never know.

What can we do? Some of the knee-jerk advice online has been ‘don’t go to work until you’ve changed all of your passwords’, but that might actually put you at more risk until the affected servers get patched with the fixed version of the OpenSSL code. Good advice is to check whether your service was impacted by the bug - this link on Mashable is pretty comprehensive - and as per the advice change your password only when safe to do so. Whatever you don, don’t use the same password for multiple accounts – consider using a secure password manager to keep track of them all. And, as always, keep a close eye on your bank statements for suspicious transactions.

Gadget Show

Championing Inventors at Gadget Show Live 2014

Innovation Theatre at the Gadget Show Live 2014

At the Gadget Show Live 2014 I will be hosting the British Invention of the Year event at the Innovation Theatre, an all-new feature for this year showcasing innovation, invention and the entrepreneur.

On Tuesday 8th April – press day at the Gadget Show Live – I’m hosting the awards event where the GSL British Invention of the Year will be announced.

From Wednesday 9th to Sunday 13th of April I’ll then be presenting two different live shows throughout the Gadget Show Live public days:

Artificial Pancreas

Artificial Pancreas (image: Renfrew Group, De Montfort University)

The British Inventors’ Project celebrates the UK innovation and startup scene. Having an idea is one thing – a very special thing – but having the meat to go to market with it and convince others to buy in to it is quite something else. Welcome to the world of the inventor. Featuring interviews with inventors and demonstrations of products ranging from wholly indispensable to the slightly strange, this show is a celebration of the very best of British invention.

The Future Tech Project is your chance to see the future before it hits the shelves! Live on the Innovation Theatre stage we’ll be getting a glimpse at the technology that will make a difference to the way we live our lives, showcasing everything from affordable 3D food printers to solar-powered racing cars.

The Innovation Theatre, in partnership with Wired, runs from 9th to 13th April 2014 in Hall 6 of the Gadget Show Live at the NEC Birmingham. Click here to find out more and book tickets for the Gadget Show Live.

Gadget Show Live 2014

$25 Firefox Smartphone - Spreadtrum Reference Device

Need to Know: Firefox OS and the $25 Smartphone

Written by David McClelland for O2 Guru Technology Blog, find the original post here.

Mozilla Firefox Booth at MWC 2014Mobile World Congress 2014 has been abuzz with talk of the $25 Firefox Phone, but just what is it and who will want one?

Many will know Mozilla Firefox as a popular and powerful open-source web browser for PC, Mac and Android smartphones.

With more of what we do every day taking place through the web — email, word processing and even gaming — it stands to reason that a web browser on its own might make a solid platform for an operating system. Just ask Google, whose Chromebook laptops run nothing more than the Google Chrome web browser yet accounted for 2 of the 3 best selling laptops at Amazon last Christmas and 20% of all notebooks sold in the US last year.

Firefox OS then is a fully-featured free operating system for mobile phones, tablets and even televisions complete with its own app store.

At Mobile World Congress this year there were several announcements from Mozilla, the not-for-profit organisation which develops Firefox, including availability of 7 new handsets running the Firefox OS.

At the moment the operating system is predominantly used in smartphones destined for developing markets such as India and Africa, seen as a potential upgrade path from the less-functional ‘feature phones’. Aside from the commercial lure for handset manufacturers to expand their business into countries not already saturated by smartphones, affordable devices such as those running Firefox OS can be enablers for individuals, providing easier access to online resources such as banking, learning and retail.

Among the new handsets announced this week is the ZTE Open II. A budget smartphone running the latest version 1.3 of Firefox OS it sports a 3.5-inch display, 1.2 GHz dual core processor, 2 megapixel camera and 256 MB of storage. Paltry specifications in comparison even to low end smartphones in maturer markets but, at the right price, it’s an affordable and attractive upgrade from a candy bar feature phone in many countries.

$25 Firefox Smartphone - Spreadtrum Reference DeviceThe so-called $25 Firefox Phone unveiled this week is another developing market device, although it won’t be available quite yet. Mozilla has, in collaboration with a mobile chipset supplier Spreadtrum, shown a prototype handset which it claims manufacturers will be able to build and retail for as little as $25. That’s right, just £15 for a smartphone.

Again, the specifications aren’t great — on your 15 quid phone you won’t even be able to download data over 3G networks, but as a relative experience it’s significantly better than the handsets they’re set to replace.

While it’s unlikely we’ll see a £15 Firefox Phone making a splash in the UK any time soon, other handsets running Firefox OS have been a hit closer to home, particularly in some Eastern European countries. And thanks to a partnership with Mozilla, Firefox OS is now set to power a new range of smart TVs from Panasonic Corporation — if only they could cost as little as £15… ^DM

First published 27th February 2014 on the O2 Guru Technology Blog. Articles, features and reviews are reproduced on this site by prior arrangement as samples of my work and remain the property of their respective publishers.

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