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Posts tagged television

The One Show - Toddlers and Tablets

Healthy Habits with Smartphones and Tablets – The One Show

This week I appeared on BBC1’s The One Show sharing advice on how parents can help their children to develop healthy habits when using smartphones and tablets.

One Show - Toddlers and TabletsFor the film, we visited a high street phone store and let a dozen under-elevens loose to observe how they used the selection of phones and tablets on display.

I’m a dad, and like most parents, I feel as if I’m making it up as I go along – which, of course, I am. How I introduce my children to technology is no exception.

Understanding a little about how children develop, what their needs are at different ages, and how easily influenced they are by adults around them, can all help make sure that children – and their parents – have a happy relationship with gadgets.

Technology offers amazing opportunities but, for me, the old adage that ‘too much of a good thing is a bad thing’ stands as true with smartphones and tablets as it does with anything else.

The One Show is on BBC1 at 7pm most evenings, viewers in the UK with a television licence can watch here.

Tech TV at London Tech Week 2017

It’s London Tech Week 2017 and all week I’m fronting Tech TV, the festival’s official broadcast channel.

Based at London Tech Week’s flagship event, TechXLR8, I am interviewing inspiring industry leaders, getting hands-on with some cutting-edge tech and…

…watching people fly around in jetpacks:

Richard Browning, the founder of Gravity, built the rocket man suit with the help of friends over eighteen months and is already a world record holder with it. Richard spoke live on the main stage at #LTW before heading outside and giving us a demo.

Now in its fourth year, London Tech Week showcases the capital’s bustling technology scene, bringing together cutting-edge developments in 5G, VR and AR, AI and Machine Learning, Connected and Driverless Cars, and more.

The RTE MoJoCon Mobile TV Studio

Live from Mojocon 2017: How mobile powered RTÉ’s pop-up multi-camera TV studio in Galway, Ireland

Last week, I was working with the RTÉ team at MoJoCon in Galway, Ireland. For the event’s live-streamed interviews, RTÉ set up a multi-camera TV studio. But, being MoJoCon, there was one major twist…

MoJoCon brings together broadcasters, journalists, filmmakers and social media specialists from around the world. Now in its third year, the event explores how new technologies – from smartphones to 360-degree cameras – are revolutionising the way we tell stories on television and online.

Teradek Live Show studio at RTE MoJoCon 2017

Teradek Live Show studio at RTE MoJoCon 2017 (image: Live X)

As was appropriate for a show focusing on mobile tech and the media, the RTÉ pop-up TV studio from which we live-streamed our interviews was powered by mobile.

It’s an impressive setup: the five studio cameras were Apple iPhone 6s plus smartphones, each kitted with superb quality Zeiss ExoLens lenses mounted on a Helium Core iPhone Rig; the vision mixing and encoding was handled by Teradek Live:Air running on an Apple iPad Pro 12.9 tablet.

For day-long power and belts and braces connectivity, the devices were hard-wired to Ethernet, although a wireless setup is perfectly possible too. I would say the only non-mobile component of the studio was the sound: traditional XLR-connected lavalier mics supplied a standard mixing desk, the master output of which fed into one of the mobile devices from which the Teradek software took its audio feed.

Here’s a clip from the end of day two where my co-host, the lovely Róisín Ní Thomáin, and I embarked on a quick studio tour.

Over two days of the show, Róisín and I interviewed some inspiring broadcasters, journalists and innovators including BBC Sport’s Conor McNamara, Story-Up’s Sarah Hill and Video Journalist Michael Rosenblum. The topics we covered were as broad as How to be an App Store Millionnaire, to The Evolution of 360, VR and AR Storytelling.

Further technical stuff about mobile studio has just been posted on the Teradek website, and all of the interviews are available on demand from the RTÉ MoJoCon YouTube channel.

First look: Nintendo Switch

It’s a familiar tale: any time I once made to play Metal Gear Solid, Pro Evolution Soccer or PaRappa the Rapper has long since been eroded by the glamours of parenthood and an erratic work schedule. Mario Kart Wii still gets spun up, as much of an occasional treat for me as it is for my kids.

I am the ‘lapsed gamer’.

On-the-go Gamer

But I do still play games. Armed with my smartphone or tablet, pocket puzzlers like the stunning Monument Valley, gory graphic novel epics such as The Walking Dead or riddlers including Mr Robot help ensure that train platform dead-time can still be game-time.

I’ve yet to tire of exploring new places with Pokémon Go, and I stand firm that the Swift Playgrounds lessons are every bit as satisfying as a good Sudoku puzzle – plus I get to learn a valuable skill.

I am the ‘on-the-go gamer’. Living the smartphone gaming dream I am part of the fastest area of revenue growth in the games industry.

So, when Nintendo formally announced its latest console last Friday I wondered if it was an attempt to appeal to gamers like me.

Nintendo Switch

Will gamers make the Nintendo Switch? (image: Nintendo)

Nintendo Switch is a hybrid tablet/TV games console, as comfortable in your hands as it is hooked up to your television. Accompanying the hardware is a strong first year line-up of titles including new the Zelda Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey adventures.

Switch Coverage

But the big question is whether Nintendo has given itself enough of a fighting chance with the Switch to emerge from the shadow of the debacle that was the Wii U, to overcome the console behemoths that are Microsoft and Sony, and to take on the smartphone gaming market.

That was the topic of the story I wrote this week for Mobile World Live: “Will Nintendo fanboys make the Switch?”.

After going hands on with the Nintendo Switch at the London launch event, including playing the new fun fighting game Arms, I headed over to BBC Broadcasting House to report back for two live spots with the BBC News Channel and BBC World News:

BBC Right on the Money

Right on the Money turns commutes into cash

Right on the Money, hosted by Dom Littlewood and Denise Lewis, returns for a second season on BBC1 this summer and I’m excited to be part of the reporting team.

In Friday’s show I front a film about how make money on the move, armed with little more than a smartphone. I look at how people are using apps including Nimber, which pays you to be a courier, YouGov, which rewards you for sitting and submitting surveys, and also Bounts and Sweatcoin, which convert exercise into cash and prizes.

Here’s a quick clip from the show:

You can watch the full Right on the Money episode here (for as long as BBC iPlayer allows, that is).

Despite this appearing on screens in the height of summer, the item was filmed during the depths of winter – the shorts and t-shirt sequence in particular during a sub-zero day in High Wycombe!

Right on the Money airs on BBC1 weekdays 9.15-10am between 11th – 22nd July 2016.

What Britain buys? Dashcams.

The convergence of car tech and consumer tech is something I’ve spoken and written about in the past, so when Channel 4 asked if I’d explain more to Mary Portas in her new show What Britain Buys I was only too happy to oblige.

Mary was particularly intrigued by the emergence of the dashcam as the must-have in-car accessory for 2016. That said, she was somewhat preoccupied with what happens when the camera faces into the car rather than out front – mercifully our own carpool karaoke didn’t make it into the final cut.

As I wrote in The Metro recently, dashboard-mounted cameras are quickly becoming a must-have accessory for safety-aware, litigation-conscious drivers. Dashcams record video in the event of a bump or prang (or even a malicious key-scrape) with some insurers offering owners lower premiums to counter so-called ‘crash for cash’ and ‘flash for cash‘ scams.

What Britain Buys with Mary Portas is produced by Sundog Pictures for Channel 4.

Videogame Nation

Virtual Reality Challenge

On Challenge TV’s Videogame Nation recently I chatted with presenter Dan Maher about the challenges faced by studios when developing games for Virtual Reality platforms.

Videogame Nation is that rare thing on mainstream television: a show about video games.

Hosted by Inside Xbox co-host Dan Maher, Aoife Wilson and John Robertson, produced by Ginx TV and airing in the UK on Challenge TV, VGN celebrates games and gaming culture with a maturity and intellect that appeals to gamers and non-gamers alike.

In this week’s episode I speak with Dan about a pet subject of mine: virtual reality. We discuss the specific challenges that studios face when developing for VR platforms, and the role that mobile can play in VR’s future.

Here’s a clip from the show where Dan and I talk about the challenges, how mobile will be an invaluable on-ramp for VR, and get hands on with Kickstarter project prototype, Goblin VR.

Hardware is one of the challenges faced by developers – platform fragmentation is already real – and so is grammar: a successful VR experience is not simply a case of lifting traditional a game and dumping it into a pair of virtual reality goggles. The fact is that developers don’t know what works yet; it’s frontier-land all over again which makes VR development a very exciting – if very risky – arena for studios to be working in.

*** UPDATE: Since I wrote this story in early 2016 VGN has, after four series and much critical acclaim, used up all of its credits – much to the disillusionment of gamers all over the internet. Fear not: without too much searching you can still find pretty much every episode of Videogame Nation on YouTube.

Sex, Lies and Online Affairs

Sex, Lies and Online Affairs – Unmasking Ashley Madison

The leak of personal details from the Ashley Madison extramarital dating website is one of the significant breaches of sensitive information in the web’s history.

High-profile data leaks have outed private customer data from internet service providers, online retailers and high-tech toy manufacturers in the last few months alone. As a result, cyberattacks have been elevated from trade-press niche news to stop-the-press nine o’clock news.

Yet the Ashley Madison data-breach is different: it wasn’t just email addresses and credit card details that were liberated this time, it was data of the most personal nature. Changing your passwords after a cyberhack is a hassle; salvaging your family relationships after being publicly outed on an adulterous dating website is something infinitely more profound.

While the story was still developing in August 2015 the team from Mentorn Media got in touch to ask if I could add some context to the story for a quick-turnaround documentary they were making for Discovery Networks. Beyond the hack itself, the show sought to explore the wider impact that internet and connected technology is having on 21st century sex and relationships – it’s not often I get to talk about teledildonics and virtual reality sex on television…

The documentary aired in September 2015 in the UK and in January 2016 in Australia. Here’s a trailer:

Sex, Lies And Online Affairs | New SpecialGet an insight into how the internet is changing marriage and monogamy in the 21st century with the new special, Sex, Lies And Online Affairs, premiering on TLC this Monday at 9:30pm AEDT.

Posted by TLC Australia on Monday, 11 January 2016

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Stay classy, Ashley: image grabbed from archive.org archive of AshleyMadison.com 2008

In whichever direction your moral compass points, Ashley Madison has for a long time been a hugely popular online destination. The Ashley Madison Agency Limited launched in 2001 and, until the events of July and August 2015, welcomed almost 125 million visitors every month from over 50 countries around the world.

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